The UNC Bear Den

Posts tagged with 'nursing'.
How far can a degree from UNC take you? After graduating from UNC’s School of Nursing, Laura Nemeth (BS-10) moved all the way across the country to work in the specialized field of pediatric critical care. But that was just the beginning of her journey. Ms. Nemeth wanted to serve the needs of communities globally, communities that often suffer from limited access to healthcare. So she saved her money, took a hiatus from her job in Tennessee, and traveled over 6,700 miles to work aboard the Africa Mercy, the world’s largest charity medical ship.
For three months, she lived aboard this gigantic vessel while it was docked in the Congolese city of Pointe Noire. There, she cared for children as they underwent surgery to repair cleft palates and remove life-threatening tumors. Ms. Nemeth has documented many facets of this journey on her blog, and we were curious to learn even more about her experiences. She took some time to speak with us about the steps that led her from UNC to the Republic of Congo and some of the valuable lessons she hopes to bring back to her work in the States.
What initially drew you to study nursing at UNC?
Nursing has been a long-time dream of mine, so when I began looking at colleges, I knew exactly what I was looking for: an in-state school where I could earn my Bachelor’s and receive top-notch medical training. UNC’s nursing program has an outstanding reputation, and it ended up being a great fit for all of my criteria.
What were some of the biggest challenges and rewards you experienced throughout your studies?
As you might imagine, studying to become a nurse was not without its challenges. Freshman year I took Biology 101 and ended up bombing my first test with a 54%. This was a big wake-up call for me as you can tell from my precise memory of the score. From that point on, I threw myself into my studies—Michener Library and I became intimately acquainted to say the least. By the end of the semester I was able to pull my grades up and, a few years later when graduation finally rolled around, my GPA was strong enough to earn a cum laude. On the whole, I was pushed quite hard throughout my education, but the challenges definitely paid off.
What inspired you to pursue this experience aboard the Africa Mercy and what steps did you have to go through to make it a reality?
In my senior year at UNC, one of my clinical instructors told me about a coworker of hers who was nursing abroad in Africa. Her story really sparked my interest: it was one of the first times that I had thought about nursing as a skill set that could take me all over the world. From then on, global nursing became a major goal of mine.
During my 5th semester in UNC’s nursing program, I had the opportunity to travel to Knoxville and work as a student nurse at the University of Tennessee Medical center. That experience of moving across the country to practice what I had learned gave me a huge confidence boost. I knew that I was capable of adapting my skills to the demands of a totally new setting.
After graduating and getting some more experience as a critical care nurse in the “real world,” it seemed like it was time to take that final leap and go abroad. Things began to fall into place: I had the money saved, the lease on my apartment was almost up, and the Mercy Ships jumped out at me as a program that needed nurses with my exact specialization. With the support of my friends and family I finalized my plans and now here I am.
Can you describe a “typical day” aboard the Africa Mercy?
As a place to live, a good word to describe the atmosphere onboard would be “communal.” Most nurses live in 6-person cabins with 3 sets of bunk beds and a shared bathroom. All meals are served buffet-style. It actually reminds me a bit of dorm life back when I lived in McCowen Hall. At UNC, I learned how to live as a member of community: making friends with the people you’re living alongside and negotiating conflicts when they arise. Those skills have definitely come in handy here.
The hustle and bustle aboard this ship is constant and sleep can be hard to come by, even in the most socially harmonious conditions. Still, it’s inspiring to see how much can be accomplished with so many people working together in such close quarters. The entire 450-person vessel is run by volunteers and there are a lot jobs that need to get done in order for the hospital staff to do their work efficiently: maintaining the ship, preparing the food, training students in the academy of long-term staff. The level of coordination involved is pretty incredible.
Nurses take rotating 8-hour shifts and your “typical day” will often change dramatically based on the shift you’re working. My three months onboard have been quite an emotional roller coaster, filled with high highs and low lows. You come face-to-face with a level of pain and resilience that can shake you to your core.
Many of the patients I care for suffer from tumors that begin to obstruct their airways as they grow. Surgeries to treat these patients are a top priority because, if they’re not performed in time, the patient can suffocate. The week that the Africa Mercy began operating in Pointe Noire, two children came into our care who were facing this condition. One of these children was still healthy enough to undergo the operation successfully, but the other child’s condition had progressed too far for her to be treated and she passed away. Experiencing these two opposite outcomes so close together has affected me in ways I can’t fully express yet. It’s definitely been cemented in my mind that access to healthcare is something that should never be taken for granted.
You’ve mentioned on your blog that you have a specialized skill set—pediatric critical care—which is well suited to the demands of medical care aboard the Africa Mercy. How have you brought those skills to bear over the past 3 months and how has your style of nursing evolved?
Pediatric critical care is a very specialized field of nursing. It requires a lot of teamwork and critical thinking skills that can only be developed with the help of time, practice, and a lot of peer encouragement. Still, on the Africa Mercy I find myself growing and adjusting in ways I hadn’t expected. The large number of patients and the flow of our work has taught me new time management skills. I’ve learned about the treatment of diseases I never encountered before in my professional life. I’ve also changed the way I interact with patients.
For a variety of reasons, nursing on the Africa Mercy causes you to build strong relationships with the people you’re caring for. Patients often have long recovery times during which they don’t require a lot of strict medical attention. What they truly need during that period is a lot of personal, day-to-day encouragement to help them through their hospital stay. The ship is well staffed with translators who are fluent in French, Kituba, and Lingala and they’re vital in helping us communicate with our patients, but oftentimes our deepest bonds are formed through non-verbal means. It’s amazing how much can be conveyed through things like gesture, body language, and touch.
What do you think you’re going to take away from your global nursing experience? 
This has undoubtedly been a life-changing experience. However, I probably won’t be able to express the scope and nature of that change until after I’ve returned to the states. I still feel like I’m headed down the same path personally and professionally, but with a different attitude. My patients and the broader Congolese community have shown me an encouraging, accepting, and loving way of life here and I hope that I will never forget that, no matter where my journey takes me. 
Thank you, Ms. Nemeth, for sharing that journey with us!
If you’d like to learn more about the exciting accomplishments of UNC’s Nursing graduates and faculty members, tune into the News section on the School of Nursing’s homepage. Also, be sure not to miss this interview with Nursing alum Heidi Burnett (BS-13), who was recently named as one of this year’s winners for the prestigious DAISY Award.
Are there other accomplished alumni you’d like to see featured on the Bear Den? Tell us about them in the comments section below or send us a message on the Alumni Association’s Facebook page.
Photos from top to bottom: a young girl sees her face for the first time after undergoing surgery, Laura Nemeth standing in front of the Africa Mercy in a Pointe Noire port, Vernel—one of Laura’s young patients— is joyfully reunited with his family after recovering from his facial reconstruction surgery.
All images courtesy of Mercy Ships & Michelle Murrey
ZoomInfo
How far can a degree from UNC take you? After graduating from UNC’s School of Nursing, Laura Nemeth (BS-10) moved all the way across the country to work in the specialized field of pediatric critical care. But that was just the beginning of her journey. Ms. Nemeth wanted to serve the needs of communities globally, communities that often suffer from limited access to healthcare. So she saved her money, took a hiatus from her job in Tennessee, and traveled over 6,700 miles to work aboard the Africa Mercy, the world’s largest charity medical ship.
For three months, she lived aboard this gigantic vessel while it was docked in the Congolese city of Pointe Noire. There, she cared for children as they underwent surgery to repair cleft palates and remove life-threatening tumors. Ms. Nemeth has documented many facets of this journey on her blog, and we were curious to learn even more about her experiences. She took some time to speak with us about the steps that led her from UNC to the Republic of Congo and some of the valuable lessons she hopes to bring back to her work in the States.
What initially drew you to study nursing at UNC?
Nursing has been a long-time dream of mine, so when I began looking at colleges, I knew exactly what I was looking for: an in-state school where I could earn my Bachelor’s and receive top-notch medical training. UNC’s nursing program has an outstanding reputation, and it ended up being a great fit for all of my criteria.
What were some of the biggest challenges and rewards you experienced throughout your studies?
As you might imagine, studying to become a nurse was not without its challenges. Freshman year I took Biology 101 and ended up bombing my first test with a 54%. This was a big wake-up call for me as you can tell from my precise memory of the score. From that point on, I threw myself into my studies—Michener Library and I became intimately acquainted to say the least. By the end of the semester I was able to pull my grades up and, a few years later when graduation finally rolled around, my GPA was strong enough to earn a cum laude. On the whole, I was pushed quite hard throughout my education, but the challenges definitely paid off.
What inspired you to pursue this experience aboard the Africa Mercy and what steps did you have to go through to make it a reality?
In my senior year at UNC, one of my clinical instructors told me about a coworker of hers who was nursing abroad in Africa. Her story really sparked my interest: it was one of the first times that I had thought about nursing as a skill set that could take me all over the world. From then on, global nursing became a major goal of mine.
During my 5th semester in UNC’s nursing program, I had the opportunity to travel to Knoxville and work as a student nurse at the University of Tennessee Medical center. That experience of moving across the country to practice what I had learned gave me a huge confidence boost. I knew that I was capable of adapting my skills to the demands of a totally new setting.
After graduating and getting some more experience as a critical care nurse in the “real world,” it seemed like it was time to take that final leap and go abroad. Things began to fall into place: I had the money saved, the lease on my apartment was almost up, and the Mercy Ships jumped out at me as a program that needed nurses with my exact specialization. With the support of my friends and family I finalized my plans and now here I am.
Can you describe a “typical day” aboard the Africa Mercy?
As a place to live, a good word to describe the atmosphere onboard would be “communal.” Most nurses live in 6-person cabins with 3 sets of bunk beds and a shared bathroom. All meals are served buffet-style. It actually reminds me a bit of dorm life back when I lived in McCowen Hall. At UNC, I learned how to live as a member of community: making friends with the people you’re living alongside and negotiating conflicts when they arise. Those skills have definitely come in handy here.
The hustle and bustle aboard this ship is constant and sleep can be hard to come by, even in the most socially harmonious conditions. Still, it’s inspiring to see how much can be accomplished with so many people working together in such close quarters. The entire 450-person vessel is run by volunteers and there are a lot jobs that need to get done in order for the hospital staff to do their work efficiently: maintaining the ship, preparing the food, training students in the academy of long-term staff. The level of coordination involved is pretty incredible.
Nurses take rotating 8-hour shifts and your “typical day” will often change dramatically based on the shift you’re working. My three months onboard have been quite an emotional roller coaster, filled with high highs and low lows. You come face-to-face with a level of pain and resilience that can shake you to your core.
Many of the patients I care for suffer from tumors that begin to obstruct their airways as they grow. Surgeries to treat these patients are a top priority because, if they’re not performed in time, the patient can suffocate. The week that the Africa Mercy began operating in Pointe Noire, two children came into our care who were facing this condition. One of these children was still healthy enough to undergo the operation successfully, but the other child’s condition had progressed too far for her to be treated and she passed away. Experiencing these two opposite outcomes so close together has affected me in ways I can’t fully express yet. It’s definitely been cemented in my mind that access to healthcare is something that should never be taken for granted.
You’ve mentioned on your blog that you have a specialized skill set—pediatric critical care—which is well suited to the demands of medical care aboard the Africa Mercy. How have you brought those skills to bear over the past 3 months and how has your style of nursing evolved?
Pediatric critical care is a very specialized field of nursing. It requires a lot of teamwork and critical thinking skills that can only be developed with the help of time, practice, and a lot of peer encouragement. Still, on the Africa Mercy I find myself growing and adjusting in ways I hadn’t expected. The large number of patients and the flow of our work has taught me new time management skills. I’ve learned about the treatment of diseases I never encountered before in my professional life. I’ve also changed the way I interact with patients.
For a variety of reasons, nursing on the Africa Mercy causes you to build strong relationships with the people you’re caring for. Patients often have long recovery times during which they don’t require a lot of strict medical attention. What they truly need during that period is a lot of personal, day-to-day encouragement to help them through their hospital stay. The ship is well staffed with translators who are fluent in French, Kituba, and Lingala and they’re vital in helping us communicate with our patients, but oftentimes our deepest bonds are formed through non-verbal means. It’s amazing how much can be conveyed through things like gesture, body language, and touch.
What do you think you’re going to take away from your global nursing experience? 
This has undoubtedly been a life-changing experience. However, I probably won’t be able to express the scope and nature of that change until after I’ve returned to the states. I still feel like I’m headed down the same path personally and professionally, but with a different attitude. My patients and the broader Congolese community have shown me an encouraging, accepting, and loving way of life here and I hope that I will never forget that, no matter where my journey takes me. 
Thank you, Ms. Nemeth, for sharing that journey with us!
If you’d like to learn more about the exciting accomplishments of UNC’s Nursing graduates and faculty members, tune into the News section on the School of Nursing’s homepage. Also, be sure not to miss this interview with Nursing alum Heidi Burnett (BS-13), who was recently named as one of this year’s winners for the prestigious DAISY Award.
Are there other accomplished alumni you’d like to see featured on the Bear Den? Tell us about them in the comments section below or send us a message on the Alumni Association’s Facebook page.
Photos from top to bottom: a young girl sees her face for the first time after undergoing surgery, Laura Nemeth standing in front of the Africa Mercy in a Pointe Noire port, Vernel—one of Laura’s young patients— is joyfully reunited with his family after recovering from his facial reconstruction surgery.
All images courtesy of Mercy Ships & Michelle Murrey
ZoomInfo
How far can a degree from UNC take you? After graduating from UNC’s School of Nursing, Laura Nemeth (BS-10) moved all the way across the country to work in the specialized field of pediatric critical care. But that was just the beginning of her journey. Ms. Nemeth wanted to serve the needs of communities globally, communities that often suffer from limited access to healthcare. So she saved her money, took a hiatus from her job in Tennessee, and traveled over 6,700 miles to work aboard the Africa Mercy, the world’s largest charity medical ship.
For three months, she lived aboard this gigantic vessel while it was docked in the Congolese city of Pointe Noire. There, she cared for children as they underwent surgery to repair cleft palates and remove life-threatening tumors. Ms. Nemeth has documented many facets of this journey on her blog, and we were curious to learn even more about her experiences. She took some time to speak with us about the steps that led her from UNC to the Republic of Congo and some of the valuable lessons she hopes to bring back to her work in the States.
What initially drew you to study nursing at UNC?
Nursing has been a long-time dream of mine, so when I began looking at colleges, I knew exactly what I was looking for: an in-state school where I could earn my Bachelor’s and receive top-notch medical training. UNC’s nursing program has an outstanding reputation, and it ended up being a great fit for all of my criteria.
What were some of the biggest challenges and rewards you experienced throughout your studies?
As you might imagine, studying to become a nurse was not without its challenges. Freshman year I took Biology 101 and ended up bombing my first test with a 54%. This was a big wake-up call for me as you can tell from my precise memory of the score. From that point on, I threw myself into my studies—Michener Library and I became intimately acquainted to say the least. By the end of the semester I was able to pull my grades up and, a few years later when graduation finally rolled around, my GPA was strong enough to earn a cum laude. On the whole, I was pushed quite hard throughout my education, but the challenges definitely paid off.
What inspired you to pursue this experience aboard the Africa Mercy and what steps did you have to go through to make it a reality?
In my senior year at UNC, one of my clinical instructors told me about a coworker of hers who was nursing abroad in Africa. Her story really sparked my interest: it was one of the first times that I had thought about nursing as a skill set that could take me all over the world. From then on, global nursing became a major goal of mine.
During my 5th semester in UNC’s nursing program, I had the opportunity to travel to Knoxville and work as a student nurse at the University of Tennessee Medical center. That experience of moving across the country to practice what I had learned gave me a huge confidence boost. I knew that I was capable of adapting my skills to the demands of a totally new setting.
After graduating and getting some more experience as a critical care nurse in the “real world,” it seemed like it was time to take that final leap and go abroad. Things began to fall into place: I had the money saved, the lease on my apartment was almost up, and the Mercy Ships jumped out at me as a program that needed nurses with my exact specialization. With the support of my friends and family I finalized my plans and now here I am.
Can you describe a “typical day” aboard the Africa Mercy?
As a place to live, a good word to describe the atmosphere onboard would be “communal.” Most nurses live in 6-person cabins with 3 sets of bunk beds and a shared bathroom. All meals are served buffet-style. It actually reminds me a bit of dorm life back when I lived in McCowen Hall. At UNC, I learned how to live as a member of community: making friends with the people you’re living alongside and negotiating conflicts when they arise. Those skills have definitely come in handy here.
The hustle and bustle aboard this ship is constant and sleep can be hard to come by, even in the most socially harmonious conditions. Still, it’s inspiring to see how much can be accomplished with so many people working together in such close quarters. The entire 450-person vessel is run by volunteers and there are a lot jobs that need to get done in order for the hospital staff to do their work efficiently: maintaining the ship, preparing the food, training students in the academy of long-term staff. The level of coordination involved is pretty incredible.
Nurses take rotating 8-hour shifts and your “typical day” will often change dramatically based on the shift you’re working. My three months onboard have been quite an emotional roller coaster, filled with high highs and low lows. You come face-to-face with a level of pain and resilience that can shake you to your core.
Many of the patients I care for suffer from tumors that begin to obstruct their airways as they grow. Surgeries to treat these patients are a top priority because, if they’re not performed in time, the patient can suffocate. The week that the Africa Mercy began operating in Pointe Noire, two children came into our care who were facing this condition. One of these children was still healthy enough to undergo the operation successfully, but the other child’s condition had progressed too far for her to be treated and she passed away. Experiencing these two opposite outcomes so close together has affected me in ways I can’t fully express yet. It’s definitely been cemented in my mind that access to healthcare is something that should never be taken for granted.
You’ve mentioned on your blog that you have a specialized skill set—pediatric critical care—which is well suited to the demands of medical care aboard the Africa Mercy. How have you brought those skills to bear over the past 3 months and how has your style of nursing evolved?
Pediatric critical care is a very specialized field of nursing. It requires a lot of teamwork and critical thinking skills that can only be developed with the help of time, practice, and a lot of peer encouragement. Still, on the Africa Mercy I find myself growing and adjusting in ways I hadn’t expected. The large number of patients and the flow of our work has taught me new time management skills. I’ve learned about the treatment of diseases I never encountered before in my professional life. I’ve also changed the way I interact with patients.
For a variety of reasons, nursing on the Africa Mercy causes you to build strong relationships with the people you’re caring for. Patients often have long recovery times during which they don’t require a lot of strict medical attention. What they truly need during that period is a lot of personal, day-to-day encouragement to help them through their hospital stay. The ship is well staffed with translators who are fluent in French, Kituba, and Lingala and they’re vital in helping us communicate with our patients, but oftentimes our deepest bonds are formed through non-verbal means. It’s amazing how much can be conveyed through things like gesture, body language, and touch.
What do you think you’re going to take away from your global nursing experience? 
This has undoubtedly been a life-changing experience. However, I probably won’t be able to express the scope and nature of that change until after I’ve returned to the states. I still feel like I’m headed down the same path personally and professionally, but with a different attitude. My patients and the broader Congolese community have shown me an encouraging, accepting, and loving way of life here and I hope that I will never forget that, no matter where my journey takes me. 
Thank you, Ms. Nemeth, for sharing that journey with us!
If you’d like to learn more about the exciting accomplishments of UNC’s Nursing graduates and faculty members, tune into the News section on the School of Nursing’s homepage. Also, be sure not to miss this interview with Nursing alum Heidi Burnett (BS-13), who was recently named as one of this year’s winners for the prestigious DAISY Award.
Are there other accomplished alumni you’d like to see featured on the Bear Den? Tell us about them in the comments section below or send us a message on the Alumni Association’s Facebook page.
Photos from top to bottom: a young girl sees her face for the first time after undergoing surgery, Laura Nemeth standing in front of the Africa Mercy in a Pointe Noire port, Vernel—one of Laura’s young patients— is joyfully reunited with his family after recovering from his facial reconstruction surgery.
All images courtesy of Mercy Ships & Michelle Murrey
ZoomInfo

How far can a degree from UNC take you? After graduating from UNC’s School of Nursing, Laura Nemeth (BS-10) moved all the way across the country to work in the specialized field of pediatric critical care. But that was just the beginning of her journey. Ms. Nemeth wanted to serve the needs of communities globally, communities that often suffer from limited access to healthcare. So she saved her money, took a hiatus from her job in Tennessee, and traveled over 6,700 miles to work aboard the Africa Mercy, the world’s largest charity medical ship.

For three months, she lived aboard this gigantic vessel while it was docked in the Congolese city of Pointe Noire. There, she cared for children as they underwent surgery to repair cleft palates and remove life-threatening tumors. Ms. Nemeth has documented many facets of this journey on her blog, and we were curious to learn even more about her experiences. She took some time to speak with us about the steps that led her from UNC to the Republic of Congo and some of the valuable lessons she hopes to bring back to her work in the States.

What initially drew you to study nursing at UNC?

Nursing has been a long-time dream of mine, so when I began looking at colleges, I knew exactly what I was looking for: an in-state school where I could earn my Bachelor’s and receive top-notch medical training. UNC’s nursing program has an outstanding reputation, and it ended up being a great fit for all of my criteria.

What were some of the biggest challenges and rewards you experienced throughout your studies?

As you might imagine, studying to become a nurse was not without its challenges. Freshman year I took Biology 101 and ended up bombing my first test with a 54%. This was a big wake-up call for me as you can tell from my precise memory of the score. From that point on, I threw myself into my studies—Michener Library and I became intimately acquainted to say the least. By the end of the semester I was able to pull my grades up and, a few years later when graduation finally rolled around, my GPA was strong enough to earn a cum laude. On the whole, I was pushed quite hard throughout my education, but the challenges definitely paid off.

What inspired you to pursue this experience aboard the Africa Mercy and what steps did you have to go through to make it a reality?

In my senior year at UNC, one of my clinical instructors told me about a coworker of hers who was nursing abroad in Africa. Her story really sparked my interest: it was one of the first times that I had thought about nursing as a skill set that could take me all over the world. From then on, global nursing became a major goal of mine.

During my 5th semester in UNC’s nursing program, I had the opportunity to travel to Knoxville and work as a student nurse at the University of Tennessee Medical center. That experience of moving across the country to practice what I had learned gave me a huge confidence boost. I knew that I was capable of adapting my skills to the demands of a totally new setting.

After graduating and getting some more experience as a critical care nurse in the “real world,” it seemed like it was time to take that final leap and go abroad. Things began to fall into place: I had the money saved, the lease on my apartment was almost up, and the Mercy Ships jumped out at me as a program that needed nurses with my exact specialization. With the support of my friends and family I finalized my plans and now here I am.

Can you describe a “typical day” aboard the Africa Mercy?

As a place to live, a good word to describe the atmosphere onboard would be “communal.” Most nurses live in 6-person cabins with 3 sets of bunk beds and a shared bathroom. All meals are served buffet-style. It actually reminds me a bit of dorm life back when I lived in McCowen Hall. At UNC, I learned how to live as a member of community: making friends with the people you’re living alongside and negotiating conflicts when they arise. Those skills have definitely come in handy here.

The hustle and bustle aboard this ship is constant and sleep can be hard to come by, even in the most socially harmonious conditions. Still, it’s inspiring to see how much can be accomplished with so many people working together in such close quarters. The entire 450-person vessel is run by volunteers and there are a lot jobs that need to get done in order for the hospital staff to do their work efficiently: maintaining the ship, preparing the food, training students in the academy of long-term staff. The level of coordination involved is pretty incredible.

Nurses take rotating 8-hour shifts and your “typical day” will often change dramatically based on the shift you’re working. My three months onboard have been quite an emotional roller coaster, filled with high highs and low lows. You come face-to-face with a level of pain and resilience that can shake you to your core.

Many of the patients I care for suffer from tumors that begin to obstruct their airways as they grow. Surgeries to treat these patients are a top priority because, if they’re not performed in time, the patient can suffocate. The week that the Africa Mercy began operating in Pointe Noire, two children came into our care who were facing this condition. One of these children was still healthy enough to undergo the operation successfully, but the other child’s condition had progressed too far for her to be treated and she passed away. Experiencing these two opposite outcomes so close together has affected me in ways I can’t fully express yet. It’s definitely been cemented in my mind that access to healthcare is something that should never be taken for granted.

You’ve mentioned on your blog that you have a specialized skill set—pediatric critical care—which is well suited to the demands of medical care aboard the Africa Mercy. How have you brought those skills to bear over the past 3 months and how has your style of nursing evolved?

Pediatric critical care is a very specialized field of nursing. It requires a lot of teamwork and critical thinking skills that can only be developed with the help of time, practice, and a lot of peer encouragement. Still, on the Africa Mercy I find myself growing and adjusting in ways I hadn’t expected. The large number of patients and the flow of our work has taught me new time management skills. I’ve learned about the treatment of diseases I never encountered before in my professional life. I’ve also changed the way I interact with patients.

For a variety of reasons, nursing on the Africa Mercy causes you to build strong relationships with the people you’re caring for. Patients often have long recovery times during which they don’t require a lot of strict medical attention. What they truly need during that period is a lot of personal, day-to-day encouragement to help them through their hospital stay. The ship is well staffed with translators who are fluent in French, Kituba, and Lingala and they’re vital in helping us communicate with our patients, but oftentimes our deepest bonds are formed through non-verbal means. It’s amazing how much can be conveyed through things like gesture, body language, and touch.

What do you think you’re going to take away from your global nursing experience? 

This has undoubtedly been a life-changing experience. However, I probably won’t be able to express the scope and nature of that change until after I’ve returned to the states. I still feel like I’m headed down the same path personally and professionally, but with a different attitude. My patients and the broader Congolese community have shown me an encouraging, accepting, and loving way of life here and I hope that I will never forget that, no matter where my journey takes me. 

Thank you, Ms. Nemeth, for sharing that journey with us!

If you’d like to learn more about the exciting accomplishments of UNC’s Nursing graduates and faculty members, tune into the News section on the School of Nursing’s homepage. Also, be sure not to miss this interview with Nursing alum Heidi Burnett (BS-13), who was recently named as one of this year’s winners for the prestigious DAISY Award.

Are there other accomplished alumni you’d like to see featured on the Bear Den? Tell us about them in the comments section below or send us a message on the Alumni Association’s Facebook page.

Photos from top to bottom: a young girl sees her face for the first time after undergoing surgery, Laura Nemeth standing in front of the Africa Mercy in a Pointe Noire port, Vernel—one of Laura’s young patients— is joyfully reunited with his family after recovering from his facial reconstruction surgery.

All images courtesy of Mercy Ships & Michelle Murrey

#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo
#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World
Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.
Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”
Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.
“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 
UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  
Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  
Quick Facts
For Bears Participating Remotely
-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total.   -Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze. -If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.  -Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.
For Bears Participating in Person
-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship. -Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here. -Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.
ZoomInfo

#BearsGive: Adamson’s Annual Blood Drive Expands to Include UNC Bears Around the World

Many college-aged kids simply think of the summer months as a time of fun and freedom from responsibility, but UNC nursing students like Ariana Roberts are conscious of the fact that more people away on vacation means less people donating lifesaving blood. Last year in mid-June, the Red Cross saw donations drop by the tens of thousands, resulting in dire national shortages. While elective surgeries can be postponed whenever resources run low, emergency transfusions and chronic illnesses like the one faced by little Ivy Tregenza (seen top-left) require a consistent supply of blood that can only be sustained through the donations of generous individuals.

Another thing Ariana Roberts knows first-hand is the serious set of financial hurdles faced by aspiring medical professionals like herself. Thankfully, the nursing scholarship she received has finally made her dreams of traveling the world to help communities with limited access to healthcare a real possibility. With the resources and expertise she’s acquired through UNC, Ariana wants to pay her education forward by joining the Peace Corps and working at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital in Ethiopia. UNC’s nursing scholarships are essential not only to our students, but to the people who will eventually depend on them for quality healthcare. Ariana says donors gifts’ have helped to fund her education and her future, “There are so many things to do in the world and I hope these dreams are only the first of many accomplished during my life.”

Faced with these two urgent needs, educational support and life-sustaining blood, a local, alumni-run business developed a unique solution to help the UNC community tackle both issues at once. John Seitz, Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and Cherry Smith (BA-74) of Adamson Funeral & Cremation Services are issuing a straightforward challenge to Bears across the globe: for every unit of blood you give to our annual campaign, we will donate $10 to a dedicated nursing scholarship. Can’t make it to the blood drive in Greeley on August 10th? If you give blood any time, anywhere between now and August 17th, just send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email detailing how you gave and your gift will be counted toward the Adamson Nursing Scholarship Fund. You can use these handy webpages from the American Association of Blood Banks and the Red Cross to locate your nearest donation center and make an appointment right now.

“The spirit of the blood drive is about saving lives,” said Adamson owner John Seitz, “but it’s also a fun and positive experience for the donors as well. Every year, we strive to give the event a carnival-like atmosphere.” Those who can attend the live occasion on August 10th will certainly be treated to a variety of exciting surprises: refreshments, give-away items including UNC gear and game tickets, a bouncy castle for the kids. However, this doesn’t mean that Bears joining in from afar have to miss out on all the fun. If you send us a photo showing off your “I Gave Blood” sticker or your brand-new blood donation band-aid along with the message saying when and where you gave, that picture will be displayed on our Alumni Association Facebook page. This gallery is an exciting way to show your Bear pride while making remote donation a truly social activity. 

UNC nursing students Brittany Ogle and Teshia Cordia have found plenty about the Adamson Blood Drive to take pride in. This will be their second year volunteering to help run the event. For Brittany, being able to address a fundamental human need is the most rewarding aspect of being involved. “95 percent of Americans will need a blood transfusion by the age of 72. I tell my friends it’s important to give now because, down the road, they’ll have to rely on others to return the favor.” Teshia says that she keeps coming back to the blood drive because she’s inspired by the donors’ demonstrations of selflessness. “One woman in particular stood out in my mind: she had lost her husband very recently, just a few weeks before, and she decided that she wanted to give back to a good cause in his honor.”  

Whether you help out because of a deep sense of personal responsibility or for the fun of participating in a global online campaign, your contribution to the Adamson Blood Drive will do two times the good. By taking the time to schedule a donation appointment or sharing this story with a friend who gives blood regularly you’ll be helping to save lives and fund the education of nursing students like Ariana, Brittany, and Teshia. As UNC alumna and blood drive coordinator Cherry Smith explained, the heart and soul of this initiative lies in our shared determination to rally together and support our community by giving of ourselves: “Donating blood is beneficial in two ways; one donation holds the possibility of saving at least three lives, secondly it helps the donor because it is good for them physically.  Men and post-menopausal women who donate three times a year reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50%.  Our blood drive motto is, ‘Do it for others…do it for yourself…do it for a lifetime.’”  

Quick Facts

For Bears Participating Remotely

-Any blood donation given between August 2nd and August 17th will be counted toward our scholarship fundraising total. 
-Remember to check those online blood donation center locators here and here. They’ll make scheduling your appointment a breeze.
-If you’re unable to give blood for any reason, consider convincing a friend to contribute in your place by passing along this link to our story: bit.ly/adamsonblood. Whether they’re Bears or friends of UNC, they can make their donation go twice as far by raising money for the Adamson Nursing Scholarship.
-Don’t forget to send us a message via Facebook, Twitter, or email (daniel.rosplock@unco.edu) telling us when and where you gave. If you have a camera or smartphone, be sure to include a post-donation photo to add to our online gallery.

For Bears Participating in Person

-The Adamson Blood Drive runs for two days, August 9th and 10th from 8 AM to 1 PM. The event will be located at 2000 47th Ave. in Greeley.
-If you give on the 9th, be sure to mention that you’d like your donation counted toward UNC’s Adamson Nursing Scholarship.
-Walk-ins are welcome, but making an appointment in advance means less waiting. You can sign up for a timeslot here.
-Thanks in part to this year’s online expansion, the donation goal for 2013 is 200 units of blood. That’s over $200,000 worth of lifesaving blood!

Photos from top to bottom, left to right: blood donation beneficiary and Red Cross poster child Ivy Tregenza, Red Cross apparel emphasizing the impact of blood donation, Adamson owners John Seitz and Jonathan Seitz (BS-07) and blood drive director Cherry Smith (BA-74), in-person and online blood donors demonstrating their enthusiasm, UNC nursing students participating in the 2012 blood drive.